Category Archives: Announcement

Remembering a Community Health Maps Milestone

By John Scott (CPSC)

In June 2016, a Community Health Maps (CHM) symposium was convened by the Center for Public Service Communications and Health-Equity.Org. It was hosted by the National Library of Medicine and held at Lister Hall on the grounds of the National Institutes of Health campus in Bethesda, Maryland.

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The relevance of the CHM initiative to NLM’s mission has to do with improving the ability of community-oriented organizations (and researchers and other public health professionals) to collect, organize and visualize data and other health information to better-understand health conditions and support decision-making for resource allocation.  While access to quality health information is frequently a focus of attention, the ability to visualize data and information — to better understand and portray their significance to the community — has received less attention. This is in part because the availability of affordable GIS platforms and data collection and visualization applications is relatively recent.  Historically, the cost to procure platforms and applications, to train users and to sustain operations has been prohibitive for communities and community-based organizations whose health budgets are already strained.

The purpose of the workshop, therefore was to share the CHM workflow with community-based and minority health organizations so that they would be in a better position to serve their populations by knowing how to collect and maintain their own data, rather than — or at least in addition to — having to rely solely on national/state agencies or majority-institution partners to provide data to them.

Participating were seventy-six community-oriented health professionals who were drawn from throughout the country. The workshop was made possible with funding by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. During the workshop several Community Health Mapping pilot projects were highlighted, including:

  • Obesity research at the University of Hawai’i School of Medicine’s Department of Native Hawaiian Health
  • Research on noise pollution at the Seattle Indian Health Board/Urban Indian Health Institute
  • Projects including a youth initiative measuring community water quality
  • Smoking cessation
  • Access to health care by migrant workers
  • Building a zika awareness curriculum at the Medical University of South Carolina
  • University of Washington School of Public Health graduate student capstone projects featuring the CHM workflow.
  • Mapping Curb Ramp Accessibility around a Silver Spring, MD Assisted Living Facility
  • Visualizing an Intervention for Tobacco Control
  • Teens Map Environmental Health of Their Community (Sea Islands, South Carolina)

Kurt Menke, of Bird’s Eye View GIS, and CHM partner, also offered training in the use of CHM tools in five parts:

  1. Introduction to Community Health Maps
  2. Learn to use Fulcrum to build a data collection form
  3. Exercise using data collection form to collect data around the conference center
  4. Mapping data collected during previous exercise online in Carto
  5. Brief introduction to mapping the data in QGIS

Learning Objectives for the training session were:

  • Describe the Community Health Maps workflow which includes low-cost and open resources for community mapping and data visualization.
  • Create a data collection tool on a mobile device that can be used to collect community data.
  • Learn how to map data collected online in and on the desktop.

Workshop participants were also introduced to the recently developed set of six online “labs”:

  1. Field Data Collection
  2. Bringing Field Data into QGIS
  3. Combining Field Data with other Organizational Data
  4. Basic Spatial Analysis
  5. Cartography with QGIS
  6. Data Visualization with Carto

These labs are now available on the Community Health Maps Resources page.

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Other highlights of the workshop include a keynote presentation by Dr. John P Wilson, Professor and Director of the Spatial Sciences Institute at USC Dana and David Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, University of Southern California. His talk was titled, “Community Health Mapping: In a World Awash with Geographic Data and Tools.” His presentation can be downloaded here as a PDF (3.86Mb).

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spotlight-balbus1Also presenting was John Balbus, M.D., M.P.H., Senior Advisor for Public Health and Director of the National Institute for Environmental Health Science-WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Sciences at the National Institutes of Health. His presentation was “From the Pump Handle to Hazardous Waste: Mapping Environmental Health and Justice.” It can be downloaded here as a PDF (3.48Mb)

Catch Community Health Maps at the Association for Prevention and Teaching Research Conference (APTR) in Savannah next week!

Last year Community Health Maps was invited to present at the Association for Prevention and Teaching Research (APTR) Conference in Albuquerque, NM. We brought two students from the University of Washington Department of  Community Oriented Public Health, and two students from the Medical University of South Carolina, to present their capstone project posters.

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Student posters from 2016

Myself, John Scott, Dr. Williamson and Dana Burshell also combined to create a CHM panel. The panel discussion session was packed and to our collective surprise we heard “oohs” and “ahhs” as we showed some of the mapping tools live. We were approached by some of the organizers about teaching a workshop the following year.

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CHM Panel Discussion from 2016

That brings us to this years conference in Savannah Georgia. We will again have a panel session which will both provide an overview of the project, and highlight recent successes. The panel will be on Thursday April 6th at 3pm.

On Friday morning we will teach a 4 hour CHM workshop. This is a hands-on training session where you will learn how to incorporate the Community Health Mapping (CHM) workflow into your research and training programs. You will:

  • Learn how to use Fulcrum to create a data collection form
  • Go outside with your smartphone/tablet to collect some data around the conference center
  • Map the collected data in Carto
  • Work with the data in QGIS
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A preview of QGIS with some Savannah data that will be used in the workshop

We hope to see you there!

 

New Year Will Bring Updated Labs Including Lab Zero!

It has been 2 years since the Community Health Maps (CHM) lab exercises were first produced. Software changes quickly, and over the last two years the tools involved in the CHM workflow have undergone many changes. For example, this fall the pricing scheme for iForm changed. Though it is still a good product, this price increase puts it out of the category of low cost software. The companion site formhub.org no longer exists, making ODK Collect more difficult to work with. Fortunately Fulcrum is a fantastic alternative to those two data collection apps. QGIS has released 5 new versions and is now at version 2.18! CartoDb has been rebranded as Carto and has a new interface.

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The QGIS 2.18 Splash Banner

All these changes means it is time for all the lab exercises to be updated. Lab 1 will now be a single lab for both iOS and Android users with Fulcrum. Labs 2-5 will be updated to QGIS 2.18. Lab 6 will be updated to Carto’s new interface. The set of companion videos will also be redone and updated.

Many have worked through these labs and some provided feedback. This information is being used to improve the labs as they are updated. One new item will be Lab Zero. While the CHM workflow is intuitive, it has been suggested that more background information could be useful. Lab Zero will be a companion reference document to the CHM labs. It will contain: A) information on the background of the CHM project, B) software installation instructions , C) a glossary of terms, D) more thorough descriptions of some technical topics like coordinate reference systems, E) a description of how to interact with the QGIS community to get additional help, and F) a list of data resources. This work is in progress and will be ready this spring. Stay tuned!

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An image from the last task in Lab 4 showing the density of diabetics in Baltimore City along with dialysis clinics

 

CHM Has a Busy Fall with Workshops and Storms!

We had a busy fall giving three workshops in September and October. First Community Health Maps traveled to Spokane Washington to conduct a half day technical workshop at the National Tribal Forum for Excellence in Community Health Practice.

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This event was organized by the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board and supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. We weren’t certain who or how many would attend, and I expect attendees weren’t entirely sure what Community Health Mapping was all about either. However, it turned out to be a very engaged group representing tribes from many regions of the country. Within a few hours everyone was able to:

  • Create a field data collection form in Fulcrum
  • Collect some data around the conference center on their smartphones/tablets
  • Make a map of their data in Carto
  • Learn how to bring the data into QGIS

This was a typical CHM workshop with most never having done any mapping work before. As such it was a very empowering experience for the participants to learn how to use this technology to map their community in just a few short hours.

From there we traveled to Honolulu, Hawai’i to give a workshop organized by Papa Ola Lokahi. There were two hurricanes (Lester and Madeline) heading towards the islands. Fortunately they both veered off and didn’t cause any damage or disruptions! The attendees came with a plethora of ideas on how mapping could fit into their work including:

A) tracking scholarship recipients of the Native Hawaiian Health Scholarships program,

B) supporting the Native Hawaiian Cancer Network,

C) mapping Dr. Ben Young’s research on historical tracking of Native Hawaiian Health professionals,

D) mapping Native Hawaiian Homelands to provide resource data to providers and community members, and

E) use the CHM “train the trainer” model to increase ongoing trainings for service providers including community health outreach workers and patient community navigators in Hawai’i.

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Papa Ola Lokahi staff learning  how to map their community with tablets and smartphones

After a brief break we headed to Seattle, Washington, again there were two separate storms including, the remnants of Typhoon Songda, bearing down on the region threatening to disrupt power and services! Again fortunately the storms didn’t make a direct hit on the area and the workshop proceeded on schedule.

We went to train students in the capstone course of the Community Oriented Public Health Practice Program at the University of Washington. This is our second year supporting this program. The first year was a huge success with two students attending the APTR Conference and presenting their work.

Like last year we had  a full house with students eager to learn about community mapping. Both first year and second year students were in attendance. Several second year students will submit proposals for consideration, to receive a stipend and support for using Community Health Maps in their capstone projects. Jamie Smeland is the first of the group to be awarded the stipend for her capstone project entitled, “Honoring the Collective Wisdom: Documenting a Cross-Racial and Intergenerational Movement to Shift Power to Youth and Parent Leaders to Improve Educational and Health Outcomes for Students of Color in South Seattle & South King County.” We look forward to working with these students in the coming months.

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UW Community Oriented Public Health Practice Program capstone students learning the Community Health Maps workflow

In the near future we will be offering an updated set of Community Health Mapping labs and a platform for CHM webinars. Stay tuned! In the meantime if you are interested in Community Health Maps and/or receiving CHM training contact John Scott (jcscott at cpsc.com) for more details.

CHM Workshop at the National Tribal Forum in Spokane, WA

This week the Community Health Maps team is heading to Spokane, Washington to teach a workshop at the National Tribal Forum for Excellence in Community Health Practice! We are honored to participate and engage a new community of mappers.2016-08-29_161231

It is a four hour workshop and by the end attendees will have:

  • Built their own data collection form in Fulcrum
  • Gone outside and collected some points
  • Made an online map of what they collected in Carto
  • Learned how to work with QGIS!

We’ll report back on how it goes when we return. Stay tuned!

CartoDB Rebranded as Carto

Community Health Maps has long recommended the use of CartoDB for those interested in low cost online mapping and data visualization. In fact, CHM caught the beginning of this wave because CartoDB wasn’t even launched until 2012!

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Original CartoDB logo

Early last month (July 2016) CartoDB was rebranded as Carto, which includes a new logo. However, once you get beyond the new logo your current account page including your data and maps remains unchanged.  You can still build maps the way you always have in what is now known as Carto Editor.

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New Carto logo

The main difference is that Carto now offers up a new interface named Carto Builder. The good news for Community Health Mappers is that their goal with Carto Builder is to introduce an updated interface. One that still does not require complex geospatial skills and programming. With Carto Builder they aim to make Location Intelligence (LI) more accessible to more people.  This means it will give you point and click access to deeper analysis of your data. Builder will have all the functionality currently found in Editor along with the new tools.

Eventually Carto Editor will be phased out and Carto Builder will be the interface everyone uses. You can request early access to Carto Builder here: http://go.carto.com/request-beta-access. New users of Carto will be given access the the Carto Builder in phases, over the next several months. All existing maps and data will be seamlessly migrated to the new interface. The following page answers Frequently Asked Questions about the migration from Editor to Builder: https://carto.com/docs/carto-builder/faqs/

Once the migration is complete I will post about the new functionality. Stay tuned!

 

Discover QGIS – A new QGIS workbook!

Two years ago, myself and several colleagues authored the GeoAcademy which is the first ever GIS curriculum based on a national standard – the U.S. Department of Labor’s Geospatial Competency Model (GTCM). The GTCM consists of the knowledge, skills and abilities needed to be a working GIS professional.  Our team was honored with the 2015 GeoForAll Educator of the Year award for this effort. The GeoAcademy consists of 5 complete college courses.

  • Introduction to Geospatial Technology Using QGIS
  • Spatial Analysis Using QGIS
  • Data Acquisition and Management Using QGIS
  • Cartography Using QGIS and InkScape
  • Remote Sensing Using QGIS and GRASS

This winter I converted the curriculum to fit into a convenient workbook format with Locate Press. The workbook is called Discover QGIS.

As you may be aware, QGIS is evolving rapidly. A new version is released every 4 months!  Due to this rapid development pace each spring a long-term release (LTR) is created. The LTR version is supported for a calendar year and is better for production environments. Originally written for QGIS 2.4, the GeoAcademy material in this workbook has been updated for use with QGIS 2.14 LTR. It therefore represents the most up-to-date version of the GeoAcademy curriculum. In addition to working with QGIS, it also includes exercises doing analysis tasks with the powerful GRASS GIS software, both alone and via the GRASS QGIS plugin. The cartography section includes exercises with InkScape. Here you’ll learn how to begin a map in QGIS and use InkScape to finish a publication quality map.

At the moment the digital version of the workbook is available as a Preview Edition for only $24.99. Purchasing this preview entitles you to the full version when it is released. There are just a few formatting issues to resolve.

This book will be a great resource for Community Health Mappers wanting to build their skills. The 470 page workbook comes with exercise data, challenge exercises and solution files!

Discover QGIS

Discover QGIS